Tag Archives: connectomics

My thoughts on the first BRAIN initiative meeting

cropped-Gogli1The first of a series of planning meetings for the BRAIN initiative took place early this week in Arlington, VA. Officially called the NSF Workshop on the Physical Principles of Brain Structure and Function, it collected many of the nation’s most prominent neuroscientists together into a stuffy hotel conference room to Continue reading

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Jeff Lichtmann TED talk

Jeff Lichtmann just did a TED talk at connetomics at Caltech that is really worth a watch if you are interested in Connectomics. A couple of weeks ago he gave a longer version of the same talk here at the MPI in Tübingen. I think it does a fantastic job of defining why someone would be interested in “Connectomics”, presents an honest depiction of the magnitude of some of the technological problems involved, and, for me at least, leaves you with some hope that we can make big things happen by pursuing this approach. Something that comes across better in person than on YouTube are these amazing reconstructions where they have gone so far as annotate the positions of all of the synaptic vesicles. Strikingly beautiful! Nicely done talk that will get a lot of exposure, and I hope that it inspires more people to be doing this kind of work.

Talk at Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna

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On Wednesday I was at the IMP in vienna to deliver a talk about my recent paper.Manuel Zimmer, my host, put together a great schedule of people to meet with and I had a great time delivering the talk .. the audience was highly engaged and asked a lot of very good questions. I spent the rest of the day having some great discussions with members of top-notch labs Continue reading

Comparative Connectomics paper is out!

papertitleFinally, after years of blood sweat and tears our comparative connectomics paper has been published. This represents a huge victory for myself and all of the people who have helped me along the way. It is rather humbling to have this work get the kind of exposure it gets by being published in Cell. It is the culmination of years of work, complete with with heart-breaking failures, long grinding hours on the microscope and in front  of the computer, and the occasional adrenaline-inducing discovery. In the paper, we compare a wiring diagram(or connectome) of the pharyngeal nervous system of the nematode Pristionchus pacificus to that of the well-known model organism C. elegans. The data are obtained by Continue reading